S’mores in a literal meaning of “some more “ is a graham cracker cookie, a square of a chocolate bar, and a toasted marshmallow. All squished together to make a sugar high dessert that you grew up with as a kid when camping. Huddling around a campfire and eating gooey marshmallows with warm chocolate between two graham crackers is that oh-so-good feeling you always need.

S'mores

However, Did you know? That every part of the process making the s’more was a product of the Industrial Revolution. Let’s start with marshmallows, the holy trinity of the s’mores body.

Mallows for s'mores

The very first marshmallows came from a plant called Althaea Officinalis. Early civilizations used the root and leaves of the plant for medicinal purposes, often to help with inflammation. (Bathroom medicine for the win!!) It was also boiled, strained, and sweetened to cure sore throats or eaten as a treat.

The white and puffy modern marshmallow looks much like its ancient ancestor. But for hundreds of years, the creation of marshmallows was very time-consuming. Each marshmallow had to be manually poured and molded, and they were a treat that only the wealthy could afford. By the end of the 19th century, gelatin has replaced the juice from the actual plant. It was a close approximation in taste and form but a much cheaper alternative.

S'mores mallows flying

Chocolate another ancient food. Mesoamericans have been eating or drinking it for 3,000 years. The Europeans who encounter indigenous people in Mexico in the 1500s that use chocolate to treat numerous ailments like dysentery and indigestion, to fatigue and dyspepsia.

it was then again, the Industrial Revolution that made chocolate cheap enough and palatable enough for the average person. The chocolate that the Mesoamericans ate was dark, grainy and to be somewhat bitter. We were big babies and could not handle the big boy spice!!!

In 1875, a candlemaker-turned-chocolatier named Daniel Peter invented a process to mix milk with chocolate. He then added some more sugar, and the modern milk chocolate bar was born. Peter’s company eventually merged with Henri Nestle’s two companies, and Peter’s invention making the Nestle chocolate bar. It proved to be so much more popular than the darker bars on the market. That other candy companies, from Cadbury to Hershey, released their own versions. Copy cats!!!

chocolate inventer for the s'mores

Now for the graham crack the root of all of S’mores out there in this scary world. Graham crackers were originally invented to curb sex drive, weird right? You see in the early 19th-century Presbyterian minister Sylvester Graham believed that humanity, was on its way to a moral collapse due to an obsession with carnal desires a.k.a maturbastion. (Don’t tell your kids!!! or parents that!!)So, he had a special process of baking using only “finely ground, unbleached wheat flour, wheat bran and coarsely ground germ. Out of this, came a bland, dry cracker that he named after himself – the graham cracker.

Mr. Graham cracker s'mores helper

To how the marshmallow, chocolate, and graham cracker became a thing that we all love now. There is no know fact other than the recipe from the 1927 edition of the Girl Scout manual Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts. Getting the S’mores name to be “some more ” or S’more. While all of these tasty innovations got the idea of roasted marshmallow, chocolate and graham crackers into people’s heads (and mouths), it all came together in gooey symphony.

Who would’ve known that there would be such a vast history and weird for a campfire treat. The only thing left to do is to sit and enjoy. Now that you are in the know

enjoying  s'mores

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Post Author: xjasminex

My name is Jasmine. I am a hard-working woman that is a certified chef with a sense of adventure. I experienced within Puerto Rican, French, Thai, and traditional cuisine; nevertheless, I am always open to learning something new. I nice to meet, and I will make you laugh, including but not limited to, I will support anyone the best of my abilities. Check out my food blog at Bingekookin.com to see more.

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